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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 24, 2018 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. a plan to halve childhood obesity by 2030. energy drinks, junk food adverts and sweets at supermarket checkouts could be restricted under proposals being unveiled in england. good morning, it's sunday the 24th ofjune. also this morning: all chant: come on england! world cup fever for england fans in russia. a win against panama today would mean an automatic place in the last 16. as england prepare, germany were on the brink of being knocked out at the group stage. but toni kroos saves the reigning champions in the final seconds against sweden. finally in the driving seat, women in saudi arabia celebrate as the ban on female drivers is lifted. and there are clear, blue skies above london this morning with many of us
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set for a sunny sunday. sarah keith—lucas has the weather. good morning. we're in for another dry and warm day today with a bit more sunshine than yesterday, and those temperatures will continue to build through the week ahead. i'll bring you more in about 15 minutes. see you then, sarah, thank you. good morning. first, our main story. a ban on the sale of energy drinks to children, tighter restrictions on junk food advertising on tv, those are just two of the government's proposals to halve childhood obesity in england by 2030. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, said the cost of obesity to individuals and the national health service is now too great to ignore. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes, reports. the government's first obesity strategy for england, unveiled in 2016, was seen by many health campaigners as a missed opportunity. ever since, ministers have been under pressure to go further and so many of the measures that were ditched two years ago are now back on the agenda. the new obesity strategy includes a proposal to ban tv advertising
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of junk food before the 9pm watershed. there will also be curbs on supermarket promotion, such as buy one, get one free deals on sugary, high—fat deals. and all primary school children in england will be encouraged to get active, through schemes like walking or running a daily mile. we are delighted to see this new childhood obesity plan. it's brave and ambitious and it's where we should be as a nation. the scottish government also plans to announce tough measures to reduce obesity, an issue that is now firmly established as one of the big public health challenges facing the uk. but after what was widely seen as a false start, the government plans will now face close scrutiny. dominic hughes, bbc news. at the world cup england will play panama this afternoon and a win will ta ke panama this afternoon and a win will take the team to the next round of
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the competition in russia. despite injury, expectations are high. panama will appreciate the pretty balmy conditions in nizhny novgorod, where the game is being played. natalie pirks has been talking to fans ahead of the match. it was once a bastion of soviet secrets, but now nizhny novgorod is revelling in its role as welcoming hosts. it's fair to say we came with a little bit of trepidation because you never know until you get here, but in general we've always found if you're nice to people, they are usually nice back. put your shirt on, people take photographs and shake hands and buy you a drink. it's the opposite, they love us. we thought it would be a war zone, but the locals have been really friendly, so so far, so good. a win against panama this afternoon would guarantee england a place in the last 16. in russia's 13th century city, gareth southgate is keen to consign past failures to history. we want to improve and show people england can play in a better way.
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we've got technically good players, we want them to get on the ball and express themselves and really attacked again, as we did from the opening minutes of the game the other night. this panama side is organised, their style is, let's say, robust. england can expect a physical test in the heat of nizhny novgorod this afternoon. but, if they play the way they played against tunisia, they should continue to thrill fans back home. that's what everybody wants to see, it excites fans, people who are happy back home to see a team play with such energy and forwardthinking team. so, yeah, keep that going. this has already been a world cup of shocks. defeat today to panama would be right up there. natalie pirks, bbc news, nizhny novgorod. sarah raynsford is there for us. sarah, we might not know much about nizhny novgorod, but we know it will
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be warm today? it already is. since early this morning we came out onto the streets and plenty of fans were hitting the streets early even though it is sunday morning, already hot here, well over 30 by the time england take to the pitch. there's a warm atmosphere here in nizhny novgorod, like in volgograd before, where england last played. this city has been totally transformed by the world cup. it's a place that in soviet times was a closed city for foreigners, this is a military city. as you can see, there's panamanians on the streets of nizhny novgorod, that didn't used to happen. it's nearly 30 years since the soviet union collapsed but this world cup has brought an unprecedented influx of foreigners, not just panama, has brought an unprecedented influx of foreigners, notjust panama, like those gentlemen, and england, but also from colombia and other countries that aren't playing here. they wanted to take a look at a place that otherwise they wouldn't have come to. absolutely. sarah, for the moment, thanks very much. sarah,
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stay cool. sarah raynsford in nizhny novgorod. saudi arabia has become the last country in the world to allow women to drive. the ban that was in place for decades was lifted last night after campaigning by human rights groups. the change was announced last september with the country issuing licences earlier this month. it's part of crown prince mohammed bin salman‘s programme to modernise some aspects of saudi society. we'll speak to one of the three million women who took to the roads for the first time last night that's at 7:20am. a group of pro—brexit politicians and business figures have urged the prime minister to speed up preparations to leave the eu without a deal. former cabinet ministers are among those to have signed a letter saying the uk must show it is ready to walk away in order to have "real leverage". tens of thousands of people marched in central london yesterday to demand a final vote on any exit deal. a 15—year—old boy has been stabbed to death following a party in east london. metropolitan police were called to a community centre in romford at around 9pm last night. three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder. there have been more than 70 murders
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in the capital so far this year. the growing tensions over the arrival of african and middle eastern migrants from across the mediterranean will be discussed by eu leaders in brussels today. it comes amid concerns about the use of charity vessels to rescue migrants off the coast of libya. more than 40,000 migrants have reached europe so far this year with a further 1,000 thought to be missing or dead having attempted the crossing. one of britain's main railway lines is back under state control this morning. the east coast line was returned to public ownership after the government ended the stagecoach and virgin franchise. it will now be known as the london north eastern railway, a name last used in the 1940s. the department for transport will run the service until at least 2020. game of thrones stars kit harington and rose leslie
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have married at a ceremony in aberdeenshire. the couple, who played on—screen loversjon snow and e—gret, first met on the programme in 2012. guests at the big day included fellow stars from the hit show peter dinklage and maisie williams. congratulations to them. it looked like a great day! under david cameron's government childhood obesity was labelled a national emergency and a pledge was made to halve the number of overweight children in england. but the policy document that followed under theresa may's leadership was criticised for being watered down, pathetic and a wasted opportunity. today is take two for the strategy, it now includes tighter restrictions for advertisers and retailers. consultant paediatrician dr mars skaejoins us from central london now. good morning and thanks for your time today. good morning. what is your reaction to this announcement, does it go far enough after the criticism in previous years?
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it's certainly another step forward but againi it's certainly another step forward but again i think it is quite watered—down. we need more strategy and more definitive ideas and action around this. 2030 is the target year for these things to be put in place, is that soon enough? if a child is four now they will be 16 by then and it will be too late. i think actually the target to halve the number of obese children by 2030 is actually very ambitious, naga. certainly they need more intervention if they're actually going to meet that target. is it $0011 going to meet that target. is it soon enough? i suppose probably not, but we know we need things that are gradual. we need gradual cultural change and we don't want to be punitive. so i would definitely advocate the target, but i think we need more to achieve that target. what more exactly, what would you
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like to see? certainly i would like to see that we bring this to the public more. more education. we need to be looking certainly at making it affordable for families to be buying fruit and veg. we need definite intervention in terms of advertising, and certainly we need nhs services to look at children, certainly the government focuses on nhs services for adults, but we need family strategies because there's absolutely no point in dealing with children without tackling their families, their parents, their siblings, and also we need lifespan strategies, so not just siblings, and also we need lifespan strategies, so notjust children but we need... notjust cradle to the grave but conception to the grave interventions because we know that in mothers who are obese, they are more likely to have of these babies who are then more likely to be obese children and adults, with the
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complications of obesity, like liver problems, obstructive sleep apnoea, mental health issues, and we need investment in that. amongst those things you mentioned, the cost of healthy food, bringing back down, it's difficult when you have these offers on unhealthy meals and families are going for this, there's obviously a problem when it comes to affordability. totally. at the moment you can purchase eight packet of custard creams for the same price or even less tha n creams for the same price or even less than you would get a packet of bananas and you would probably get a 241 on custard creams —— a packet. which is a family going to choose? —— two for one. we need more robust weighing and measuring. in manchester we have pioneered weighing and measuring in primary school children year—on—year, but we don't know anything about the number of obese children in secondary schools. that's been completely
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ignored. we know the numbers double from reception to year 6, so what are the numbers in secondary schools? we need more data. we need to help families to help their children. looking at primary school initiatives, one of them is this 15 minute, active mile initiative, getting children to run 15 minutes a day. is that a good step in the right hurricane? it's definitely a good step but i can tell you 15 minutes once a day isn't going to cut the mustard —— right direction. we need to get families out there in parks, we need to be finding sports centres for families to be going to. we need to get children active because there's no point going home from school and sitting on a couch oi’ from school and sitting on a couch or in front of a computer. doctor mars skae, very interesting to talk to you, thank you for joining us on breakfast. thank you. it looked like a lovely start in london. what about the rest of our
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squirrel a nice start in most places, sarah? it will be -- what about the rest of the nation? a glorious day if you like your weather sunny, dry and warm and not everybody does. this is the view from a weather watcher in buckinghamshire. blue skies. you can see the cirrus cloud, quite a few places will have high cloud today, sunshine could be hazy and times but looking glorious, dry and fine. through much of the week ahead, that will be the story. dry, sunny and those temperatures will be on the up over the next couple of days. all this dry, settled weather down to a big area of high pressure sitting across the uk. not many isobars on the map today so lighter winds than over recent days. still a bit breezy for the four north of scotland with more cloud for the western isles, northern isles, into northern parts of mainland scotland —— for the far
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north. elsewhere a bit of fairweather cloud and cumulus cloud bubbling up. blue sky is where, lots of sunshine, light winds. around the coast we could see sea breezes in the afternoon, a touch cooler around the afternoon, a touch cooler around the coast with the sea breezes —— blue skies elsewhere. around the 20s today and a bit cooler in the north of scotland. dry, settled and warm into the evening hours. dry conditions overnight as well. the clear skies will mean it will turn fairly fresh first thing monday, not too uncomfortable for sleeping at the moment. temperatures dipping down into single figures in the countryside for some. then things continue to warm up through this week. yellows at the moment. if you look at the colours, they are being replaced by orange later in the week, that means much warmer air piling in from the continent later in the week. another warm, dry day to come on monday with high pressure still in charge. breezy at times in
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parts of east anglia and the south—east with more cloud drifting m, south—east with more cloud drifting in, and more cloud in the far north—west of scotland. elsewhere, sunny, dry and warm with temperatures in the high 20s and continuing to warm up. we could see 30 or more later in the week. thanks very much, sarah! this morning, women in saudi arabia can get in a car and drive. the decades—long ban came to an end last night after years of campaigning. however, there are still limits on what women living in the country can do. human rights groups want wider reforms. to open a bank account, get married or divorced can only happen by first getting the 0k from a male relative. salwa nugali is professor of american literature at king saud university. shejoins us from the capital riyadh. doctor salwa good morning and thank you forjoining us. i wonder if you could explain the significance of today because it is an important day, women can drive officially for
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the first time. explain why that is so the first time. explain why that is so important. well, it is a concerted efforts, 25 years since the administration have been asking that women should be driving. for safety, you know, when they have their children with the driver, you know, to be free of these worries and to make life easier. 25 years have passed and this is a moment, it is an event, for us, but finally, it is an event, for us, but finally, it is coming to be. it is happening. i'm sorry to interrupt, many people would find it incredible that up until now women have only been able to get into a car, either if it is driven by a male relative or a driver. that's right, isn't it? yes. and so from today women will be able to drive, issued driving licences, so to drive, issued driving licences, so what is the mood like? what are
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people telling you about how significant this is the them and their day—to—day lives? significant this is the them and their day-to-day lives? a lot of excitement, sometimes uncertainty, should they drive or not? many people are worried about what it will be like to go out there in the car with men who are not used to seeing women driving. of course, you know, aggressive driving, women do not aggressively drive, women are safe drivers, and so it is mixed feelings about, you know, is it going to be safe? is it going to be 0k? should we go out in the streets oi’ 0k? should we go out in the streets or wait for one week, too, maybe a month. i think the generation now who have been living abroad for a long time and have their driver ‘s licence and know how to get used to the driving conditions, i should say, from other drivers and, you
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know, there are many young men, really under aged men who are boys, driving, so there is a bit of hesitation, fear, about it but i think many women are ready to go. there is a small delay on the line, sorry to interrupt, but i was saying change is slow in saudi arabia, i was the correspondent there for a number of years and a lot of this was discussed in 2010, 2011, and it has taken until now for this to happen. these are all steps in a long process. yes, yes, but you know onceit long process. yes, yes, but you know once it starts, it starts, it is going to go fast. what happens next? what would you like to see change next? i think i would like to see more done for the women regarding custody of their children, travelling, regarding, you know, many other things, even positions in the market place. everything, paes,
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you know, the payments, you know, their salaries are good and when they match the man but i think positions are still held by men. i think many good positions in the country could be handled many qualified women in the country. and i would like to see that. i'm sorry again to interrupt. do you think this will be an easy progress because there has been a lot of opposition, hardline clerics do not wa nt to opposition, hardline clerics do not want to see this happen. how easy to use think it is the seachange in the kingdom? —— to see change. use think it is the seachange in the kingdom? -- to see change. once you start with a first step you can only speed up, you cannot go back, you can only speed up, you can only move forward , can only speed up, you can only move forward, you cannot go back or slow time, you cannot reverse it, and you can only move forward, and i think
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we are moving forward. salwa i am grateful for your time. we are moving forward. salwa i am gratefulforyourtime. enjoy driving, if you are heading out later. nice to talk to you. are you would be driver? i would like to think so. why? i am genuinely interested , think so. why? i am genuinely interested, you have never driven me anywhere. where would you want to go? we will talk about it later. let's look at the papers. the entertainmentjournalist emma bullimore is here to tell us what's caught her eye. good morning. argue a good driver? i'd like to think i am all right. i'm not sure anybody would admit to being a bad driver. i'm terrible at parking. me too. i am good, buti would say that, wouldn't i? you've been looking at serena williams?” ama been looking at serena williams?” am a massive tennis fan and i'm very excited about the bill did not
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maternity leave is not something that tennis has to deal with the lot asa that tennis has to deal with the lot as a sport so serena williams has gone on maternity leave as world numberone and gone on maternity leave as world number one and come back and her ranking has slipped in the major tournaments there is no question about her seeding so at the french open she came in unseeded which meant that in the first round she is playing really, you know, big players rather than usually it is supposed to be set up so that the big players played up and coming players and then you get a better final so the question is will wimbledon respond to that? john mcenroe has been accused of sexism towards her in the past when he talks about the greatest player of all time, he came out and said they must cede her, she must have a better position, they must respect the fact thatjust better position, they must respect the fact that just because better position, they must respect the fact thatjust because she has had maternity leave is a man she is still an incredible player and will bea still an incredible player and will be a contender seed the us open this weekend have also said they will change theirs, they will give her a seeding because they are saying you shouldn't be penalise the going off to have a baby but this is uncharted territory for tennis, players are
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playing later in both the women's and ben's game, roger federer is 36 and ben's game, roger federer is 36 and winning titles, she has won seven will miller and —— wimbledon titles. so much to watch today, djokovic. lots of sport. operation mannerfought. djokovic. lots of sport. operation manner fought. this is djokovic. lots of sport. operation mannerfought. this is president trump's visit to the uk. the mail is pointing out there is a huge security operation and it points out they could leave the rest of the country without adequate protection —— manafort. country without adequate protection -- manafort. they are getting in a fla p -- manafort. they are getting in a flap about the because so many police officers will be called upon because it is a controversial visit and it must be said either when noncontroversial leaders come to the country, lots of security steps up but it will lead visible policing reduced, it may be unsafe for other parts of the country but personally lam parts of the country but personally i am interested in the parts of the country but personally lam interested in the itinerary they have, flying into stansted. who flies in the stands that from the us? melania trump will be going to a
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hospital or charity, hopefully not wearing that coke. what did you think about that. —— coat. wearing that coke. what did you think about that. -- coat. to say that she did not notice is a bit weird to me. there must be something at play. yesterday we were talking about one of the directors at netflix being sacked he used inappropriate language in the meetings and bbc chiefs now what lord sugar to go on a course because he put a tweet out of one of the football teams and it mocked the picture as if they were stallholders. he is saying i recognise those from people telling me things... senegal? the senegalese team? he says it was misjudged, he denies racism, a lot of people are upset and what is interesting is that the bbc apparently said he has to do that the bbc apparently said he has todoa that the bbc apparently said he has to do a training course but there is i'io to do a training course but there is no suggestion of the apprentice being dropped or him facing any sort of proper punishment which is in direct contrast to the rose and story we have been talking about
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where she treated something racist and a vc came down heavily on her. —— roseanne. —— abc. they are doing a spin—off but who knows if it will be as successful and people were applauding the swift action and saying well done for making a stand quickly that the bbc seems a bit more vague it will be interesting to see if they come under more pressure to have a stronger response.“ they'd do you think there is room for forgiveness so to speak if somebody it —— shows contrition perhaps? potentially, but depending oi'i perhaps? potentially, but depending on what he said. if you are in lord sugar's position, i would think twice about what i tweet and i have i'io twice about what i tweet and i have no profile compared to someone like that so i think it seems really arrogant, actually, the think you can get away with this kind of posting on social media. something entirely different, game of thrones. i know you are a fan. two of their stars who met on the set of the show tied the knot. their characters had
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a relationship, ill—fated, at it is a relationship, ill—fated, at it is a lovely picture, they got married in scotland, rose leslie, kit harington, often they are frowning because it is a dark show so what of confetti, so many fans are delighted. a lovely day of it is well in injury. in very. there are problems perhaps, potential problems, for space passengers in the future? this is anna fischer, the future? this is anna fischer, the first mother in space and the nasa astronaut who is saying everyone is falling over for the space tourism and want to get into space tourism and want to get into space and she is saying you will feel rough, travel sickness is a big problem in space, obviously not many of us have experience of it, but be careful. some people cannot cope with west coast mainland trained so never mind space. i cannot see it being as an issue. it is the sitting back... do not go into space. the
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training that astronauts do, the physical, and you have to... it isn't just the geforce physical, and you have to... it isn'tjust the geforce is it? it is sensory isn'tjust the geforce is it? it is sensory predation. your body mass changes, your organs shift.“ sensory predation. your body mass changes, your organs shift. it is so much for your brain to take in, it is so alien. i do not fancy it. emma, will talk to you in an hour. the andrew marr programme is on bbc one from 9am this morning. what do you have on the programme this morning, andrew? afun a fun packed allah as ever. you will have seen the horrific story on the front of the sunday times about british hospitals, we have also had £20 billion coming into the nhs announced by the prime minister, i am joined byjeremy hunt to talk about all of that and also by neil griffith who is the shadow defence spokesman to talk about the future of defence cuts and so forth and again the defence secretary allegedly threatening to bring down the prime minister this morning is a
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lot to talk about there. i've been talking to robert harries, the author about his great series being taken up by the royal shakespeare company and finally boris becker on the strange and slightly murky story of his african passport and the extent to which he is or is not now bankrupt. interesting stuff, we will see you later. that is nine o'clock on bbc one. we're in oldham's wales street, which has changed its name to england street for the duration of the world cup. our reporter ian haslam is with some of the patriotic neighbours gearing up for tonight's three lions clash with panama. tell us all about this. yes, hello, welcome to this very patriotic street, this is wales street and it has changed its name for the duration of the world cup to england street. you may be able to see but all of the bunting, 1500 england flags here at least, they are very into the world cup. this is chris
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ansley. this is the organiser. why? i think ansley. this is the organiser. why? ithink in ansley. this is the organiser. why? i think in support of the boys in russia. we are a patriotic bunch here on the england street as it is i'iow here on the england street as it is now and we wanted to do our little bit so hopefully the boys can re—create it over there. bit so hopefully the boys can re-create it over there. are you confident? we had a good start against tunisia, three points in the bag, it should be easy again today but with england you never know! bring on belgium! indeed. liam, you have told us how impressed you are and how would build the community feeling. are you confident? i think they are a chance because we have played generally to score goals and some teams have good players but don't have, like, as much friendship as england do and don't pass, they do want the goals. prediction to win? 2-0. we will be back here in a
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few minutes when hopefully we managed to wake up and round up some of the neighbours. join us for that. why are they not up yet, it is of past seven! confident prediction, 2-0. past seven! confident prediction, 2—0. why not! headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and naga munchetty. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. new proposals have been announced to try to halve childhood obesity in england by 2030. the government has published a set of measures which includes a ban on the sale of energy drinks to children, tighter restrictions on junk food advertising on tv and limits on supermarket promotions. labour's shadow health secretary jon ashworth criticised the plan as another watered—down, lame duck strategy. however, health officials have broadly welcomed the announcement. public health england are really pleased to see the depth and the breadth of this second chapter of the childhood obesity plan. it builds on the success
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of the first chapter, the introduction of a levy on sugar—sweetened drinks, the structured re—formulation programme, and it includes things like the ambition to introduce a 9pm watershed on advertising unhealthy foods to our children during family viewing. saudi arabia has become the last country in the world to allow women to drive. the ban that was in place for decades was lifted last night after campaigning by human rights groups. the change was announced last september with the country issuing licences earlier this month. it's part of crown prince mohammed bin salman‘s programme to modernise some aspects of saudi society. a 15—year—old boy has been stabbed to death following a party in east london. metropolitan police were called to a community centre in romford at around 9pm last night. three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder. there have been more than 70 murders in the capital so far this year. a group of pro—brexit politicians and business figures have urged the prime minister to speed up preparations to leave
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the eu without a deal. former cabinet ministers are among those to have signed a letter saying the uk must show it is ready to walk away in order to have real leverage. tens of thousands of people marched in central london yesterday to demand a final vote on any exit deal. some sewage companies in the uk are regularly dumping untreated human waste into the rivers of the country. an investigation by the bbc‘s country file programme has said 25,000 storm drains designed only use to be used during heavy rain are frequently overflowing, mixing rainwater with sewage. the environment agency said they are committed to tackling the problem but campaigners say more needs to be done. we need first of all to be investing in the infrastructure to improve the sewage treatment facilities. we need to be issuing biggerfines
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for when illegal discharges do occur, and we also only to do more to create sustainable drainage around new housing estates and areas where we are creating lots of hard services which are discharging large amounts of rain fall very quickly into the combined sewer and drainage networks, causing these overflows. voting has begun in the presidential and parliamentary elections in turkey. president erdogan is hoping for another five—year term, during which he'd take on sweeping new powers. but he's facing a strong challenge in the presidential contest mainly from the centre—left, and in the parliamentary vote from a coalition of opposition parties. one of britain's main railway lines is back under state control this morning. the east coast line was returned to public ownership after the government ended the stagecoach and virgin franchise. it will now be known as the london north eastern railway, a name last used in the 1940s. the department for transport will run the service until at least 2020. do you go qe of the babies? not
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really. but this is very cute. -- gooey. —— over babies. new zealand's prime minister, jacinda ardern, and her partner, clarke gayford, have been proudly showing off their new born baby girl, neve. ms ardern became the first woman in the country's history to give birth while in office. she is regaining her strength thanks to macaroni cheese and has been swamped with messages of good wishes including a private e—mail from the queen. she'll spend a second night in auckland public hospital with her daughter, who has been dubbed the prime miniature. we chose neve because we just liked it and when we knew her we thought she looked like she suited the name. also it means in various forms bright and radiant and snow, which seemed like a good combination for matariki and for solstice. great pictures! are you getting the
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fever? i wasn't but now everyone is an today is the day. we can actually qualify for the last 16 —— and today. we can get out of the group stage this time with a game to spare. we need to win against panama. a case of old against young, england with their youngest world cup squad, third youngest in the tournament, panama with the third oldest. but pressure is on because expectations are high! it always is. when there's such an expectation it isa when there's such an expectation it is a done deal, we should know that doesn't always happen. let's not jinx it! we're going to hear from gareth southgate in a minute, but how close were germany to an early exit last night? i can tell you, 30 seconds from a draw with sweden that would have made it very difficult for them to get out of the group stages. the reigning champions have been knocked out in the group stages at the last two world cups and germany looked to be following suit when ola toivonnen gave sweden the lead. marco reus then equalised early in the second half. but germany had a man sent off
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and they looked doomed until toni kroos stepped up in the 95th minute to keep them alive in russia. germany are now second in group f, mexico are top after they beat south korea 2—1. west ham's javier hernandez on the scoresheet in rostov. and england will have to win and score a bucketful of goals if they're to top group g tonight, that's because belgium beat tunisia 5—2 thanks to a couple of goals from a couple of premier league forwards. romelu lukaku and eden hazard both scoring twice in moscow. they play england on thursday. so englad then have made the almost 600 mile journey from their training base in repino on the gulf of finland to nizhny novgorod where they'll play panama in their second group game at this world cup at 1pm this afternoon. the players and staff arrived
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at their hotel yesterday, a handful of fans outside the gates waiting to greet gareth southgate's side as they look to confirm their place in the knockout stages, and the manager is in positive mood. history is not the important thing for this team. they have an opportunity to create their own history, and they should be excited about that. you know, they're a young team that are going to get better and better. i really enjoy working with all of them and i'm intrigued to see how far they can go and how well they can play, because i think we saw moments of that the other night and we've got to continue that and keep pushing and driving to be as good as we can be. plenty of england fans in nizhny novgorod too, very much making their presence felt in russia's fifth biggest city. kick off as i mentioned is at 1pm this afternoon and the match is live on bbc one. away from the world cup, and the england rugby union coach
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eddiejones says his side are better for the series defeat against south africa. they finished with a flourish in the final test, winning 25—10 at newlands. jonny may with england's try thanks to brilliant work from danny cipriani, starting his first international test for a decade. we want to be the best team in the world, and you have to go through these periods to find out some things about yourself. we've done that, and now we want to kick on in november when it all starts again. we get another 400 caps back and we've got nine or ten club games to go through before we get the team together. so england finally got the performance they were after in south africa, but the same cannot be said for the zulu impi dancers who have become part of the pre—match build up. u2 are laughing already! it was rather wet at newlands. —— you two. they struggled to stay
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on their feet as they ran out ahead of the teams, perhaps a taste of the good, old british weather was what helped england feel at home. faded well! —— they did well. faded well! -- they did well. they carried on regardless. ireland wrapped up a historic series win against australia, their first in almost 40 years. their only try of the match coming from cj stander. the rest of the damage coming from the trusty boot ofjohnny sexton to give them a 20—16 win. it means they take the series 2—1. and scotland ended their summer tour with an emphatic win over argentina. peter horne scored two of their six tries in the 44—15 win. in rugby league, england came from behind to ease past new zealand in a test match that was played in the us city of denver. it was england's first match since losing the world cup final last year and they looked in great form, debutantjake connor with one of the tries. 36—18 the final score. lewis hamilton is on pole position for today's french grand prix. the race hasn't been on the formula one calendar
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since 2008, and a decade on hamilton dominated qualifying, beating team mate valtteri bottas to claim the 75th pole of his career. it was a busy day for england's women cricketers. they played two twenty20 games yesterday, beaten by south africa in the first and then bouncing back to defeat new zealand. england now lead the tri—series group with four points, with one round of games left to play on thursday. the men are back in action later this morning as they take on australia in their final one—day game at old trafford. have a look at this. and rory mcilroy had an unwanted visitor on the tee at the travellers championship in conneticut. he was all set, ready to swing, when a squirrel wanted to get involved and put mcilroy off. it's almost like he is taunting him as well, isn't it? yellow it is. ——?
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it is. did he not perform well? he ended eight shots off the lead us. that's what golfers do, blame anyone but themselves —— eight shots off the lead. —— leader. a win against panama this afternoon would see england through to the knockout stages of the world cup. so, is victory for the three lions a foregone conclusion or could first timers, panama cause a surprise upset? let's ask the former england player, joleon lescott. good morning. you know about playing for england at a big tournament, what is it like when there's so much expectation on the team. how difficult is that to manage? this time it is different. the nation wa nt time it is different. the nation want and believe we can do it, where we have hoped in previous tournaments. this time around, the age of the squad as well has helped
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the team to be fearless in their approach to everything. because they are young? they are fearless, it's a generational thing, are young? they are fearless, it's a generationalthing, most are young? they are fearless, it's a generational thing, most kids are. the panama team is a lot older, more experienced, our team is younger, fresher, hungrier, where is the advantage? with england, the quality and the belief, i think the whole history of wanting to win the world cup and not doing great is the italia 90 tournament, hopefully this is the occasion where we can to great things. one of the big differences will be the heat, which could be a disadvantage, you know about that. you played in 2012 in the heat, you scored, so for you it was fine, but how will they be coping and how does that affect the game? it will affect the game at the later stages, but if england control the pace of the game and the tempo then they can control the workload and the effort that is put in. can i ask a stupid question? yeah. when
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you celebrate and you have scored and you have six grown menjumping on top of you, don't you just say, easy! not when it is that kind of occasion. you have to think as a fan, what would you do at home? if you score you will be excited. you can get hurt. you don't even think about that. the adrenaline. you just don't worry about it until you get off the pitch. i want to ask about team selection today, there has been a lot talked about. we know dele alli won't play, there are suggestions about raheem sterling, perhaps marcus rashford, ruben loftus—cheek, who is going to play? there's been talk about rashford coming in for sterling but the manager has chosen the squad to perform and everyone is capable of playing for this team at this level so every team will do well to have these players. every player has gone
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with the expectation of performing at this level. we have heard about the team saying about the good atmosphere and camaraderie, someone said that over dinner they aren't even on their phones, they are chatting away and they are really very gelled. when a team sheet is lee, whether it was or not, something like that, is there friction in the team when you're talking amongst yourselves? —— elite. everyone wants to play, of course, but before the tunisia game it was documented the manager selected the team and told the players so they knew and it didn't affect us then —— leaked. hopefully he has told the players who are playing and the players who are expecting to play. how competitive the are you when it comes to the training, you are fighting for your place? very competitive, you don't go and in due your fellow teammate, they are at the world cup because they are at the world cup because they have that mentality —— injure.
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they are pacing themselves because of the heat but also for the tournament, there's lots of expectation and pressure on them, how will gareth southgate manage the team? one game at a time but with an eye on the prize? of course, it will come with managing the whole situation on if they qualify today, then going into the belgium game topping the group, i'm sure he will manage it better because the expectation of the nation will increase and as a player you start to believe. they believe now but as you get closer to the end goal you think it will happen. as you mentioned, there's lots more expectation this time around, how has gareth southgate managed that and protected his team from those expectations? i'm not sure but i think the way they handled it, the relationships area they handled it, the relationships are a lot closer, there seems to be are a lot closer, there seems to be a lot more relaxed so that is how the situation but also the fact that gareth would have managed these players and not a number of years,
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having managed the under 21 and these players flourish throughout these players flourish throughout the younger age groups. you are talking about how people at home celebrate when they watch the football and how you wouldn't mind being bundled loads of your teammates when you score so you have been there, you have done it, you have proven yourself, you have scored in a world cups it is fine, what will you do today, where will you be watching, withdrew, and how do you celebrate? i'm not actually watching the game today. my son has a game so... watching the game today. my son has a game so... that's the case. i will have to pay attention. then... so you wouldn't try to avoid the score and watch it on catch up later? i'm not sure i will be able to avoid the score, people will cheer when they get a school. also when you watch your son play, are you an annoying dad who shouts instructions?” your son play, are you an annoying dad who shouts instructions? i am quiet, i let the other dads do that. it has been so lovely talking to
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you. coverage of the world cup, including the england game at 1pm, is on bbc one. in case you didn't know something big is happening today. there will also be commentary on bbc radio 5live. if you have to do something else, was on the radio while you are out. sarah's here with a look at what's happening with the weather. it looks like it will be quite a nice one. it does, we have got some beautiful conditions in the forecast if you'd like your weather dry and sunny. a month ofjune is shaping to bea sunny. a month ofjune is shaping to be a particular warm and dry in some places, no rain is in the forecast over the next week for many parts of the country so you might be asking for some rain for your garden by the end of the week. this is bucks, blue skies, sunshine is rather hazy through that cloud but lots of sunshine on offer. —— watching child. temperatures on the up. driving the western coming up, caregivers were the bay, any rain is
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clearing away from the northern isles and then dry across the board, a bit ofa isles and then dry across the board, a bit of a fresh start to the morning but it is looking dry with some glorious sunshine. war clouds drifting into the east of scotland, north—east england and high cloud over the south turning things hazy. in the sunshine and the lighter winds than we have seen in recent days it will fill warmer so temperatures in the mid 20s across england and wales. scotland and northern ireland's 21 or 22. cool towards the far north. a beautiful evening, and let sunshine around, try and clear overnight, more cloud working into the far north—west of scotla nd working into the far north—west of scotland but elsewhere, reasonably fresh overnight. temperatures down into single figures in the countryside, not too uncomfortable for sleeping. this week we will see those orange colours returning to the map which is a warm air mass drifting in from the continent, and it will push the temperatures up.
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monday, a warm day, lots of sunshine but a little more cloud on the far north—west of scotland. some fairweather cloud elsewhere. sea is developing around the coast so—called around the coast over the next few days but inland, look at those temperatures! —— so cooler around the coast. another warm, dry, sunny day on tuesday with a little cloud drifting here and there so not wall—to—wall sunshine but you will fill pleasant indeed if you like your weather dry and sunny. —— will feel. the bridges into the high 20s on tuesday and continues, we could see 30 in a few spots towards the middle part of this week. of course we we re middle part of this week. of course we were talking about the england— panama football match and actually the weather in russia in a vision of the weather in russia in a vision of the rod looks similar as it does back home and 31 degrees out there, lots of funny and lots of dry weather on the card are not too dissimilar to the weather that we are seeing here in england at the
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moment. sarah, thank you. it looks boiling in russia, the england team have the work cut out to deal with the heat. and some people here could get into that spirit because it will be so warm. some england fans have been cheering on the team at the world cup by wearing the replica kit, others have flags flapping on their cars. a street in greater manchester has gone one step further. supporters living on wales street in oldham have come up with a novel solution to prove their support for the three lions, despite what their address suggests. ian haslam is there for us this morning. explain what is going on. well, as you say, this is wales street in oldham and that is the sign but they have changed things to the duration of the world cup. a new site is a there that says england street. i do not think it is therefore much longer than a few weeks but as you
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can see, lots and lots of flags and bunting. i've counted almost 2000 flags so it is the dedication to that you referred to. people on the street, we have rounded them up, they are a little bit tired but a few coffees, they are ok now. this is chris. chris is the organiser. you do it every time there is a tournament and spend the money. why? to support the boys out in russia. we are a bit patriotic here and we wa nt we are a bit patriotic here and we want to get behind the team. how much bunting is there? about a kilometre. obviously a flag on every house, about 40 flags, 1500 flags all up. how much have you spent? probably in the region of a couple of 100 quid, everyone chips in a fiver, my son goes around and collects a fiver a week before and we bought it off amazon, i allowed to mention that? everyone gets in the spirit of things and we all walk
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in and put it up. the community spirit is right around here. —— rife. we will all go down the pub later and watch the game, we are lucky in that everyone gets on. think if adjoining is chris, let's go over here now because some other people have come out of their houses. —— thank you forjoining us chris. right and bushy, houses. —— thank you forjoining us chris. rightand bushy, england's 1966, geoff hurst and bobby moore, while they do well this you? hopefully. you have lived years, is is this a regular occurrence? every two years. it is the optimism get any better every year because i remember 1986 onwards, you know, never that great for england. we are hoping for the best, that is all you can do, hope they play well and win a few games. there you go, stay a long time, that is confidence. let's cross the road. it is early to be
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playing football on the street but it has not put off ben and liam. how optimistic argue about england's chancers, living on this most positive of streets? about 1096. really? no, 100 really. do you think you will win today? yes. give us a score prediction. 2-0 to england. good stuff. but be the these will people who have just got out of bed with their coffee and they have theirflags. with their coffee and they have their flags. what is it living here? brilliant, you have got to be special to live on the street, you have to go in front of a panel and we have to vote if you are fit to live here. you have done all that but the question is have you paid your fivers. yes, they come around and not on the door or throwing stones at the window but we have all put in. have a dog, is he getting into the spirit? rolf is, yes. you need to get him a shirt. give us a
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score prediction. header, straight in. 3-0, rushford. are you optimistic? definitely. we roared in a few coffees later in about one hour's time. what the street this is! the glorious, it looks wonderful! they are all getting into the spirit. wales street now england street. when 18—year—old david wilson was thrown from his motorbike in pembrokeshire, the future he imagined for himself was in doubt. he had broken his back and neck and for a time, it looked unlikely he'd ever walk again. fast forward 34 years and today, he is one of wales' most celebrated landscape photographers. david joins us now. good morning. good morning. tig is back to that period where everything look pretty bleak for you. 34 years, it is slightly misty! like i said, i had a motorbike accident and ended
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up had a motorbike accident and ended up in cardiff in a specialist spinal injuries unit to six months. i was one of the luckier ones in that i walked out. quite slowly. i think i was leaning on my dad at the time but i did walk out. a lot of people i left behind, they kind of didn't walk out, really, and it is being in a place like that the six months, i mean, 34 years on it is the indelible edged into my mind and i think these guys even though i have not seen them since 1984. —— etched. i get the feeling that you were determined to have a positive outlook and kept going. is that fair and true? outlook and kept going. is that fair and true ? eventually. outlook and kept going. is that fair and true? eventually. forthe outlook and kept going. is that fair and true? eventually. for the first numberof years, i and true? eventually. for the first number of years, i was young, i was vain, and sort of walking down the street with a pronounced limp and having obvious issues was not a good look. so, yeah, i had some dark
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times. but eventually i looked at myself in the mirror and said you have a choice. you can beat yourself up have a choice. you can beat yourself up oryou can have a choice. you can beat yourself up or you can get your proverbial bottom into gear and start looking on the positive side and i know it sounds horrendously cliche but it is true. well, often cliches are the truth and photography was the journey or the route that helped you? i bought my first hamra -- robran i had my motorbike, driving around the british are taking pretty ordinary photos. some people may say i still do, i don't know! but it kind of, it ignited something in me. a passion. a love. and when i came out of hospital it helped the kind of get me out, to stop me thinking about myself and my issues or what i perceived was my issues. and it got
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me walking and it got me going to vantage points and taking photos and i went from there. looking at some of these pictures, this photography which you can do in a studio, some of it is pretty easy if you are doing portraits but you are not, you are doing it in wild wales. some of these vantage points take some getting true. it would be fair to say that most people's perception of a landscape photographer is some kind of annoyingly rugged, physically intact being with a large rucksack traipsing across the landscape. i rucksack traipsing across the landscape. lam not rucksack traipsing across the landscape. i am not that person. i'd dodder across it quite stumbling lee and increasingly, as i get older, things are deteriorating. —— stumblingly. my wife is incredible. she comes out with me. to be perfectly honest, and she will hate me for saying this but i will anyway, she deserves some credit for
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this book as well because i would say probably half the photos in this book, particularly these ones out of the middle of nowhere, would not have happened without her. why? because she got up out there? she let me live on her while i am walking over tricky to rain. —— lean. fairly uncomplainingly. to my face, anyway. —— terrain. perhaps later she is grumpy, i don't know, but credit where credit is due, without her, half of this book would not have happened. so, there we are. we should say she is here in the wings. hello! i think we should say she is here in the wings. hello! ithink you we should say she is here in the wings. hello! i think you have embarrassed her. deservedly so. you said when you were started you took ordinary photographs but when did you know you were good? do you ever? what or who made you realise there was perhaps on talent? if you're a commercial photographer does anybody
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buy your stuff and they don't, you ought to get anotherjob. a publisher are very supportive but they are a commercial publisher so they are a commercial publisher so they don't carry baggage so i'm obviously, it would appear, i am producing stuff but they like and they are prepared to print and publish and distribute. by customers who buy my prints for their walls,, yeah, that's saying something. —— my customers. although i am reticent in bigging myself up, i must be doing something right. i think they speak for themselves, thank you so much we re for themselves, thank you so much were coming in and thank you, anna as well. hello, charlie and harry, wherever you are. is that the one? hello, charlie and harry! and the book is called a year in pembrokeshire. be with you shortly, headlines
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